Monthly Archives: December 2010

Simultaneous Images, One Idea

       I wrote to you in a previous blog about two images shot from variable angles then, merged into a single image to exaggerate the sense of stereopsis and motion. (All previous blogs are at the website.) I wrote to you about … Continue reading

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Color as Symbol

  In reply to a recent blog, Kay Halcrow asked if my paintings were inspired or connected to the burning of Rome. The use of red has long been associated with fire, just as all colors are saturated with cultural … Continue reading

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The Standard Form For the Ideal Landscape

 In the 17th century Claude and Poussin were two French artists working in Rome. They had perfected a compositional structure for landscape painting. The right or left wings of the painting would serve as framing curtains like the curtain framing … Continue reading

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Erasable Intentions

Ernst Gombrich introduced me to this idea: as  we make marks our imagination slips away from its original intention and follows the suggestions of the marks we are making. Each mark, each stroke, each line drives us to new possibilities.  If we … Continue reading

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Van Gogh’s Brush

Here’s how a connoisseur or a conservator would look at a Van Gogh. The painting is Van Gogh’s from 1889 during his stay in San Remy, Provence in the hospital of St Paul de Mausole.   Van Gogh was allowed … Continue reading

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Principle of Radiation, The Sunburst

When John Ruskin outlined the Renaissance principles of composition, the principle of radiation was a fundamental pattern.  The idea of the radial burst or sunburst (sometimes referred to as the web-in-spokes) is ancient, not only pan historic but also pan … Continue reading

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Vibration In Layers

Recently,  I wrote you about achieving depth through layers  with architectural images (pics in the Met Museum, see a previous blog). I showed you a sequence of  images being layered to create  a feeling of more motion and space.  This … Continue reading

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What’s In Motion?

Maybe this has happened to you. You’re sitting in a train looking out the window at an adjacent train on an adjacent track.  It’s very close to you. One of the two trains slowly starts to move.  Is your train … Continue reading

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Anticipation

 Da Vinci was one of the earliest artists to observe that we scan from one focal point to another searching for confirming information,  that we connect  a path of focus points into a stream which both constructs and anticipates information. … Continue reading

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Underpainting?

(example 1, the underpainting).  Underpaintings are often referred to as the early stage in which an artist loosely blocks in the values, shapes and some texture information.  Later color will be  added opaquely or as a glaze tint  to the underpainting … Continue reading

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